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News — 1914-1918

Shell Shocked is today’s PTSD

1914-1918 Canadian Corps eighteen-pound gun Field Gun Passcendaele PTSD shell shock shrapnel The Battle of Vimy Ridge the final battle of Amiens The Great War The Somme Verdun Vimy 100th anniversary Ypres

Shell Shocked is today’s PTSD

The Herbert Laurier “Bert” Irwin Story: by Herbert James Irwin from the Memory Project. When war was declared in 1914, Herbert Irwin tried to enlist immediately but because he was only 16, his family retrieved him from the recruiting depot. Herbert returned the following year and was accepted into the Artillery. My name is Herbert James Irwin, the son of Herbert Laurier "Bert" Irwin, who enlisted in the Canadian Field Artillery in 1915 at the age of seventeen, and served overseas until the end of the war. He was engaged in a number of battles: Ypres, Somme, Vimy Ridge, Arras,...

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Thomas Marion's Veteran Story By Malcolm Fraser

1914-1918 73rd Battalion 85th Battalion Cambrai. dogfight front line No Man’s Land Passcendaele shell shock the Black Watch The Great War trench warfare trenches Vimy Ridge western front WWI

Thomas Marion's Veteran Story By Malcolm Fraser

The photo is Letter from Thomas Marion to his mother. At the time of writing Thomas was in hospital in Brighton, England and commented on the many from his unit who have been killed, "many a mother's heart is breaking for her boy who will never return." My name is Malcolm Fraser. As far as my father is concerned, he enlisted when he was seventeen in the 73rd Battalion of the Black Watch, and he served at Lens, (Passchendaele, and Cambrai. He talked very, very little about the war. Once they were watching a dogfight over the trenches, and the...

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Before the Sliver Cross, there was the "Dead Man’s Penny"

1914-1918 Canadian soldiers Dead Man's Penny Hill 145 No Man’s Land Passcendaele The Battle of Vimy Ridge The Great War The Somme Treaty of Versailles trench warfare Verdun Vimy Memorial Vimy Ridge western front WWI Ypres

Before the Sliver Cross, there was the  "Dead Man’s Penny"

Information was sources from warmuseum.ca and wikipedia.org I was at a show recently and someone brought me a WW1 Memorial Plaque, known as the“Dead Man’s Penny”.  I was quite intrigued by it and thought I would source out the story and share it with you.   For the families and loved ones of fallen soldiers, grief and sorrow usually occurred without the finality or closure offered by having funeral rites or burials at home. Their memorial efforts might have included participation in national or local commemorative efforts, but they also involved oral traditions; maintaining and displaying cherished photos, letters, or...

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The Great War. 1914-1918

1914-1918 Allied Powers Barbed Wire Camouflage Canadian soldiers Chlorine gas Conscription front line Jusqu'au bout Mustard gas No Man’s Land Passcendaele Poppy shell shock tank The Great War The Somme Treaty of Versailles trench foot trench mouth trench warfare trenches Verdun Vimy Ridge western front WWI Ypres Zeppelin

The Great War. 1914-1918

Here is the back of a shirt I have coming to the site, it has a chronological list of events of Canada's participation in the great war, I researched the information from various sites and this is what I came up with. The Great War 1914-1918   Canada at War August 4, 1914: When Britain went to war on August 4, all colonies and dominions of the British Empire, like Canada and Newfoundland, were automatically at war. The Battle of Verdun February 21 - December 18, 1916: The Battle of Verdun is considered the greatest and lengthiest in world history....

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The War Continues

1914-1918 Canadian Corps Hill 145 The Battle of Vimy Ridge trenches Vimy Memorial Vimy Ridge western front WWI

The War Continues

Information sourced from Veterans Affairs Canada and Historica.ca   Even though Vimy Ridge was captured, the jubilation of the victory would be short-lived. The war would rage on for another 19 months taking the lives of many of the Canadians who had survived and triumphed there.  Those months would prove to be extremely difficult for the Canadians and Allied Forces.  The Canadians had to capitalize on that hard fought victory and had to rout the Germans out to gain ground and maintain the foothold that had cost them dearly. The bane of war made the surroundings a virtual waste land. ...

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