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News — British Expeditionary Force

No Man's Land

1914-1918 British Expeditionary Force No Man’s Land The Great War trenches Vimy Ridge western front WWI

No Man's Land

information provided by firstworldwar.com Most commonly associated with the First World War the phrase "no man's land" actually dates back until at least the 14th century.  Its meaning was clear to all sides: no man's land represented the area of ground between opposing armies - in this case, between trenches. For newly arrived novice soldiers No Man's Land held a certain allure.  Such troops were cautioned against a natural inclination to peer over the parapet of the trench into No Man's Land.  Many men died on their first day in the trenches as a consequence of a precisely aimed sniper’s...

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The Battle of Vimy Ridge - Fast Facts (Courtesy of Veteran's Affairs Canada)

1914-1918 British Expeditionary Force Canadian Corps Passcendaele The Great War Treaty of Versailles trench warfare Victoria Cross Vimy Ridge western front WWI

The Battle of Vimy Ridge - Fast Facts  (Courtesy of Veteran's Affairs Canada)

(Photo Courtesy of Brandi Murray it is an excerpt from her Great Grandfathers War Diary.) The assault on Vimy Ridge, the northern part of the wider battle of Arras, began at 5:30 am on Easter Monday, April 9, 1917. It was the first occasion on which all four divisions of the Canadian Corps attacked as a composite formation. The Canadian achievement in capturing Vimy Ridge owed its success to a range of technical and tactical innovations, very powerful artillery preparation, sound and meticulous planning and thorough preparation. At Vimy, the Canadian Corps and the British XVII Corps on their immediate...

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