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News — Canadian Army

Vimy Ridge and Thain MacDowell’s Victoria Cross

1917 April 9 Canadian Army Canadian Army captain Thain MacDowell machine gun Remembering Vimy Ridge Soldiers’ Tower at U of T. The Battle of Vimy Ridge tunnels U of T Magazine valour Victoria Cross

Vimy Ridge and Thain MacDowell’s Victoria Cross

By Steve Brearton, U of T Magazine In the pre-dawn gloom of April 9, 1917, Canadian Army captain Thain MacDowell slipped over the top of his trench in northern France and began advancing toward Vimy Ridge. As heavy guns from his battalion rained shells down on German defensive positions, the 26-year-old MacDowell became separated from his fellow soldiers. Attended by only a pair of runners, he continued forward, lobbing a pair of hand grenades at two German machine gun nests that were guarding an underground dugout. MacDowell scored a direct hit. He approached the dugout and called down the tunnel...

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A POEM WORTH READING

Canadian Army Poppy Remembrance Day The Battle of Vimy Ridge Veteran

A POEM WORTH READING

With Remembrance day just past, I hope you had time to reflect on the sacrifices our Military endures, I was recently sent this poem and it is a poem worth reading. He was getting old and paunchy And his hair was falling fast, And he sat around the Legion, Telling stories of the past. Of a war that he once fought in And the deeds that he had done, In his exploits with his buddies; They were heroes, every one. And 'tho sometimes to his neighbors His tales became a joke, All his buddies listened quietly For they knew where...

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Vimy a Stunning Memorial and Live Minefield

Al Puxley Beaumont-Hamel Canadian Army Canadian National Vimy Memorial Chlorine gas Lest we forget Mother Canada The Battle of Vimy Ridge The Great War Unexploded ordnance Vimy 100th anniversary Vimy Memorial Vimy Ridge Vimy Sheep Walter Allward WWI

Vimy a Stunning Memorial and Live Minefield

This appeared in Maclean’s Magazine July 1, 2005 "NOTHING EXCEPT a battle lost can be half so melancholy as a battle won," wrote the Duke of Wellington about the dead and dying strewn across the field of Waterloo. A Canadian could have said as much on April 12, 1917, while standing on the grim heights of Vimy Ridge. Mercifully brief as the four-day assault was - a blink of the eye among the infamous months-long battles of the Great War - the victory still cost 3,600 Canadians their lives and wounded 7,000 more. The human damage has, to the extent...

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The last Canadian killed in the WW1 minutes before armistice

Canadian Army Canadian Corps Commonwealth War Graves Commission First World War Book of Remembrance George Lawrence Price PTSD Sniper The Battle of Vimy Ridge the ceasefire The Great War the last Canadian killed WW1

The last Canadian killed in the WW1 minutes before armistice

by Nelson Wyatt, The Canadian Press Originally published: November 10, 2014 George Lawrence Price was a typical Canadian soldier in the First World War, except for the timing of his death. He holds the sad distinction of being the last Canadian and last Commonwealth soldier to die in the meat-grinder conflict that claimed more than 60,000 Canadians in its four years. A total of 10,000 men were killed, wounded or listed as missing from all participating armies on the last day of the war, according to historical records. Price, a 25-year-old farm labourer before he enlisted, was struck by a...

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A Soldiers' Life

Canadian Army Canadian Corps carvings at Vimy Remembering Vimy Ridge The Great War trench art Trench fever trenches Vimy 100th anniversary “Canadian” cave complex

A Soldiers' Life

Information collected from Veteran’s Affairs Canada, The Canadian War Museum , WW1 Canada and Wikipedia Even before going into battle on the front lines, each soldier had to endure the reality of living with an army in the field.  Once assigned to the assault on Vimy Ridge, Canadian troops set up camps several kilometres behind the lines. There, though far from the front and out of the reach of enemy fire, they all learned to deal with death.  The spring of 1917 was one of inclement weather, and mud was a fact of life and soldiers frequently found themselves wading...

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