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News — Canadian Corps

Battle of Vimy Ridge

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Battle of Vimy Ridge

Article by Richard Foot published 07/20/06 last edited 06/24/15 from Historica Canada The Battle of Vimy Ridge, during the First World War, is Canada's most celebrated military victory — a sometimes mythologized symbol of the birth of Canadian national pride and awareness. The four divisions of the Canadian Corps, fighting together for the first time, attacked the ridge from 9 to 12 April, 1917 and succeeded in capturing it from the German army. More than 10,500 Canadians were killed and wounded in the assault. Today an iconic white memorial atop the ridge commemorates the battle and honours the 11,285 Canadians...

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The last Canadian killed in the WW1 minutes before armistice

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The last Canadian killed in the WW1 minutes before armistice

by Nelson Wyatt, The Canadian Press Originally published: November 10, 2014 George Lawrence Price was a typical Canadian soldier in the First World War, except for the timing of his death. He holds the sad distinction of being the last Canadian and last Commonwealth soldier to die in the meat-grinder conflict that claimed more than 60,000 Canadians in its four years. A total of 10,000 men were killed, wounded or listed as missing from all participating armies on the last day of the war, according to historical records. Price, a 25-year-old farm labourer before he enlisted, was struck by a...

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Shell Shocked is today’s PTSD

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Shell Shocked is today’s PTSD

The Herbert Laurier “Bert” Irwin Story: by Herbert James Irwin from the Memory Project. When war was declared in 1914, Herbert Irwin tried to enlist immediately but because he was only 16, his family retrieved him from the recruiting depot. Herbert returned the following year and was accepted into the Artillery. My name is Herbert James Irwin, the son of Herbert Laurier "Bert" Irwin, who enlisted in the Canadian Field Artillery in 1915 at the age of seventeen, and served overseas until the end of the war. He was engaged in a number of battles: Ypres, Somme, Vimy Ridge, Arras,...

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A Soldiers' Life

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A Soldiers' Life

Information collected from Veteran’s Affairs Canada, The Canadian War Museum , WW1 Canada and Wikipedia Even before going into battle on the front lines, each soldier had to endure the reality of living with an army in the field.  Once assigned to the assault on Vimy Ridge, Canadian troops set up camps several kilometres behind the lines. There, though far from the front and out of the reach of enemy fire, they all learned to deal with death.  The spring of 1917 was one of inclement weather, and mud was a fact of life and soldiers frequently found themselves wading...

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Remembering Vimy Ridge

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Remembering Vimy Ridge

By Matthew S. Williams April 9, 2013   Though many people outside of Canada may not know much about it, the Battle of Vimy Ridge was one of the most significant battles of World War I and a key moment in Canada’s history. Taking place between April 9th and 14th of 1917, it was not only a Canadian-led offensive; it was also the only Allied offensive victory in the war to date. And just as importantly, we in Canada consider it a defining moment in our history, when our country ceased being a colony and became a nation. Surprising then...

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