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Battle of Vimy Ridge

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Battle of Vimy Ridge

Article by Richard Foot published 07/20/06 last edited 06/24/15 from Historica Canada The Battle of Vimy Ridge, during the First World War, is Canada's most celebrated military victory — a sometimes mythologized symbol of the birth of Canadian national pride and awareness. The four divisions of the Canadian Corps, fighting together for the first time, attacked the ridge from 9 to 12 April, 1917 and succeeded in capturing it from the German army. More than 10,500 Canadians were killed and wounded in the assault. Today an iconic white memorial atop the ridge commemorates the battle and honours the 11,285 Canadians...

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Veteran Stories: Francis Bathe a letter from The Battle of Vimy ridge

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Veteran Stories: Francis Bathe  a letter from The Battle of Vimy ridge

The picture is a Letter from Francis Bathe to his sister May (Bathe) Spencer from Doncaster Military Hospital on April 16, 1917. Mr. Bathe had just been at Vimy Ridge where he was injured. Courtesy of Jack Bathe, Francis' son. (Information courtesy of the Memory Project) April 16, 1917. Dear May, I guess you will be a little surprised to hear that I am back in Blighty, but of course you can never tell when those shells are going to shake paws with you, especially where we were last Monday on Vimy Ridge. It's just a week ago today when...

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Before the Sliver Cross, there was the "Dead Man’s Penny"

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Before the Sliver Cross, there was the  "Dead Man’s Penny"

Information was sources from warmuseum.ca and wikipedia.org I was at a show recently and someone brought me a WW1 Memorial Plaque, known as the“Dead Man’s Penny”.  I was quite intrigued by it and thought I would source out the story and share it with you.   For the families and loved ones of fallen soldiers, grief and sorrow usually occurred without the finality or closure offered by having funeral rites or burials at home. Their memorial efforts might have included participation in national or local commemorative efforts, but they also involved oral traditions; maintaining and displaying cherished photos, letters, or...

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The War Continues

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The War Continues

Information sourced from Veterans Affairs Canada and Historica.ca   Even though Vimy Ridge was captured, the jubilation of the victory would be short-lived. The war would rage on for another 19 months taking the lives of many of the Canadians who had survived and triumphed there.  Those months would prove to be extremely difficult for the Canadians and Allied Forces.  The Canadians had to capitalize on that hard fought victory and had to rout the Germans out to gain ground and maintain the foothold that had cost them dearly. The bane of war made the surroundings a virtual waste land. ...

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The Battle of Vimy Ridge (Information provided by Veteran's Affairs Canada)

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The Battle of Vimy Ridge (Information provided by Veteran's Affairs Canada)

Introduction: The decades since the Battle of Vimy Ridge have slipped by, but the legacy of the Canadians who accomplished so much in that pivotal First World War battle lives on. Many say that Canada came of age as a country on those hard April days in 1917. The First World War: The First World War was the largest conflict the world had ever seen up until that time. It came about due to the political tensions and complex military alliances in Europe at the time. The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in the summer of 1914 resulted in an...

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