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A Brief History of the Wristwatch.

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A Brief History of the Wristwatch.

By: George Downs/The Wall Street Journal The military origins of wearable tech, a century before the Apple Watch Today it seems quaint to think of people getting the time from church bells and factory whistles, but before World War I it was commonplace. People had clocks at home, and gentlemen carried pocket watches, but most people went without a watch. Wristwatches were chiefly worn by women as decorative pieces rather than for precise timekeeping. The Great War was a turning point. Crouching in a trench or exchanging gunfire with the enemy, soldiers hardly had the time to grab a watch...

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The mourning figure of “Mother Canada” of the Vimy Memorial.

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The mourning figure of “Mother Canada”  of the Vimy Memorial.

The figure of a cloaked young woman is called Mother Canada or Canada Bereft she stands alone on the wall at the north-eastern side of the memorial and overlooks the Lens-Douai Plains, the objective for the Canadian Corps, who successfully won at the Battle of Vimy Ridge. Winning this high ground gave the Allies a view across the German rear area. Mother Canada has her head bowed, her eyes cast down, and her chin resting in one hand looking below her at ground level is a marble coffin, representing Canada's war dead bearing a Brodie helmet and a sword, and...

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Vimy a Stunning Memorial and Live Minefield

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Vimy a Stunning Memorial and Live Minefield

This appeared in Maclean’s Magazine July 1, 2005 "NOTHING EXCEPT a battle lost can be half so melancholy as a battle won," wrote the Duke of Wellington about the dead and dying strewn across the field of Waterloo. A Canadian could have said as much on April 12, 1917, while standing on the grim heights of Vimy Ridge. Mercifully brief as the four-day assault was - a blink of the eye among the infamous months-long battles of the Great War - the victory still cost 3,600 Canadians their lives and wounded 7,000 more. The human damage has, to the extent...

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How Hitler spared Vimy Ridge

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How Hitler spared Vimy Ridge

By Ron Haggart Special to the Toronto Star Sat., April 7, 2007 When Hitler's armies were advancing across France in 1940, the Canadian government put out a story that German troops were damaging the memorial at Vimy Ridge. Walter Allward's soaring monument had been unveiled only a short time before, in 1936, the only official ceremony (except for abdication) in the short reign of Edward VIII. A popular postage stamp was widely in circulation, so Canadians were thoroughly familiar with Vimy Ridge, and they were outraged. There was someone else who was outraged by this story; his name was Adolf...

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