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News — No Man’s Land

One of the most famous snipers of WW1

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One of the most famous snipers of WW1

Source:www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/sub.cf...native/norwest Henry Louis Norwest is one of the most famous Canadian snipers in the First World War, and 3rd on the Allied Kills List. Norwest was born in Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta, of French-Cree ancestry. In his nearly three years of service with the 50th Canadian Infantry Battalion, the lance-corporal achieved a confirmed kill record of 115. Norwest is one of only about 830 members of the CEF to be awarded the Military Medal and bar. Norwest enlisted in January 1915 under the name Henry Louie, and was discharged after three months for misbehaviour. Eight months later, he signed up again,...

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Some of the Most Effective Melee Weapons of WWI, The Bayonet Was Not One of Them

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Some of the Most Effective Melee Weapons of WWI, The Bayonet Was Not One of Them

By William Mclaughlin WWI was a terrifying fusion of old and new. An infantryman might have a slower-firing bolt action rifle, or he could find himself behind a rapid-firing Maxim gun. Mazes of trenches that ran for hundreds of miles were the setting of a lot of fighting. Trenches could be filled with gas, soaked and muddy, or partially collapsed by artillery. This made for frantic close-quarters-combat. In these confines and situations of overwhelming charges of men, melee weapons became extremely effective. A somewhat surprising fact is that the least preferred melee weapon was the bayonet, a knife attached to...

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Battle of Vimy Ridge

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Battle of Vimy Ridge

Article by Richard Foot published 07/20/06 last edited 06/24/15 from Historica Canada The Battle of Vimy Ridge, during the First World War, is Canada's most celebrated military victory — a sometimes mythologized symbol of the birth of Canadian national pride and awareness. The four divisions of the Canadian Corps, fighting together for the first time, attacked the ridge from 9 to 12 April, 1917 and succeeded in capturing it from the German army. More than 10,500 Canadians were killed and wounded in the assault. Today an iconic white memorial atop the ridge commemorates the battle and honours the 11,285 Canadians...

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Veteran Stories: Francis Bathe a letter from The Battle of Vimy ridge

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Veteran Stories: Francis Bathe  a letter from The Battle of Vimy ridge

The picture is a Letter from Francis Bathe to his sister May (Bathe) Spencer from Doncaster Military Hospital on April 16, 1917. Mr. Bathe had just been at Vimy Ridge where he was injured. Courtesy of Jack Bathe, Francis' son. (Information courtesy of the Memory Project) April 16, 1917. Dear May, I guess you will be a little surprised to hear that I am back in Blighty, but of course you can never tell when those shells are going to shake paws with you, especially where we were last Monday on Vimy Ridge. It's just a week ago today when...

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Thomas Marion's Veteran Story By Malcolm Fraser

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Thomas Marion's Veteran Story By Malcolm Fraser

The photo is Letter from Thomas Marion to his mother. At the time of writing Thomas was in hospital in Brighton, England and commented on the many from his unit who have been killed, "many a mother's heart is breaking for her boy who will never return." My name is Malcolm Fraser. As far as my father is concerned, he enlisted when he was seventeen in the 73rd Battalion of the Black Watch, and he served at Lens, (Passchendaele, and Cambrai. He talked very, very little about the war. Once they were watching a dogfight over the trenches, and the...

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