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News — shrapnel

The Broadie Helmet

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The Broadie Helmet

From the War museum.ca/ Wikipedia   Did you know, that beginning in 1916, Canadian soldiers wore “Brodie helmets” during the First World War? It is hard to believe but early in the First World War, none of the combatants provided steel helmets to their troops. Soldiers of most nations went into battle wearing cloth, felt, or leather headgear that offered no protection from modern weapons. Most soldiers on the front lines just wore fabric caps. The head wounds that many men suffered soon made it clear that moving to steel helmets would save lives but it would be April 1916...

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Shell Shocked is today’s PTSD

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Shell Shocked is today’s PTSD

The Herbert Laurier “Bert” Irwin Story: by Herbert James Irwin from the Memory Project. When war was declared in 1914, Herbert Irwin tried to enlist immediately but because he was only 16, his family retrieved him from the recruiting depot. Herbert returned the following year and was accepted into the Artillery. My name is Herbert James Irwin, the son of Herbert Laurier "Bert" Irwin, who enlisted in the Canadian Field Artillery in 1915 at the age of seventeen, and served overseas until the end of the war. He was engaged in a number of battles: Ypres, Somme, Vimy Ridge, Arras,...

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Veteran Stories: Francis Bathe a letter from The Battle of Vimy ridge

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Veteran Stories: Francis Bathe  a letter from The Battle of Vimy ridge

The picture is a Letter from Francis Bathe to his sister May (Bathe) Spencer from Doncaster Military Hospital on April 16, 1917. Mr. Bathe had just been at Vimy Ridge where he was injured. Courtesy of Jack Bathe, Francis' son. (Information courtesy of the Memory Project) April 16, 1917. Dear May, I guess you will be a little surprised to hear that I am back in Blighty, but of course you can never tell when those shells are going to shake paws with you, especially where we were last Monday on Vimy Ridge. It's just a week ago today when...

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