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News — The Great War

One of the most famous snipers of WW1

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One of the most famous snipers of WW1

Source:www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/sub.cf...native/norwest Henry Louis Norwest is one of the most famous Canadian snipers in the First World War, and 3rd on the Allied Kills List. Norwest was born in Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta, of French-Cree ancestry. In his nearly three years of service with the 50th Canadian Infantry Battalion, the lance-corporal achieved a confirmed kill record of 115. Norwest is one of only about 830 members of the CEF to be awarded the Military Medal and bar. Norwest enlisted in January 1915 under the name Henry Louie, and was discharged after three months for misbehaviour. Eight months later, he signed up again,...

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Letter censorship on the front line

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Letter censorship on the front line

By Anthony Richards-30 May 2014 Keeping the Home Front posted, with millions of carefully censored letters zipping between soldiers and loved ones, was vital for maintaining morale. Each week, more than 12 million letters were delivered to soldiers during the First World War, providing opportunities to exchange news with family and friends, request parcels and confirm that they were still in one piece. As the main method of communicating with home, servicemen placed huge importance on correspondence which, from our modern perspective, can reveal the writer’s thoughts, beliefs and experiences while providing an immediacy often lacking in diaries or memoirs....

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A Brief History of the Wristwatch.

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A Brief History of the Wristwatch.

By: George Downs/The Wall Street Journal The military origins of wearable tech, a century before the Apple Watch Today it seems quaint to think of people getting the time from church bells and factory whistles, but before World War I it was commonplace. People had clocks at home, and gentlemen carried pocket watches, but most people went without a watch. Wristwatches were chiefly worn by women as decorative pieces rather than for precise timekeeping. The Great War was a turning point. Crouching in a trench or exchanging gunfire with the enemy, soldiers hardly had the time to grab a watch...

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Wear your poppy close to your heart!

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Wear your poppy close to your heart!

With Remembrance Day fast approaching, you will see people wearing poppies on their lapels, sweaters and jackets, just about everywhere.  Lt. Colonel John McCrae’s poem 'In Flanders Fields', written in 1915 is the basis of the red flower; that’s over 100 years ago. Poppies are worn to commemorate fallen soldiers of past wars dating back to the First World War, leading right up to today. There really isn’t etiquette as to where you should wear a poppy; however, I think it you should wear it on the left side and keep it close to your heart, knowing the price people...

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The Road To Vimy 100: How One Soldier Changed My Life

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The Road To Vimy 100: How One Soldier Changed My Life

Story shared from EF Educational Tours David is a Social Studies teacher from Summerside, PEI.  “I have been teaching at my school since 1995, but I didn’t catch the travel bug until about 10 years later.  I have always had a deep appreciation and respect for our veterans every November 11th. On a typical Remembrance Day, I would be sure to attend a ceremony at a local cenotaph and pay my respects in that fashion. My love affair with historical travel began almost in accident in 2006, when I participated in a summer institute and study program where I travelled...

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