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News — Treaty of Versailles

Wear your poppy close to your heart!

Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms Canadian Legion Canadian soldiers First World War November 11th Pittance of time Poppy Poppy Campaign Remembrance Day Terry Kelly The Great War Treaty of Versailles two minutes of silence Vets Canada Vimy 100th anniversary

Wear your poppy close to your heart!

With Remembrance Day fast approaching, you will see people wearing poppies on their lapels, sweaters and jackets, just about everywhere.  Lt. Colonel John McCrae’s poem 'In Flanders Fields', written in 1915 is the basis of the red flower; that’s over 100 years ago. Poppies are worn to commemorate fallen soldiers of past wars dating back to the First World War, leading right up to today. There really isn’t etiquette as to where you should wear a poppy; however, I think it you should wear it on the left side and keep it close to your heart, knowing the price people...

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The Road To Vimy 100: How One Soldier Changed My Life

1917 21st Battalion April 9 Canadian Infantry EF Educational Tours November 11th Remembrance Day The Battle of Vimy Ridge The Great War Thélus Military Cemetery Treaty of Versailles Vimy Memorial Vimy Ridge WWI

The Road To Vimy 100: How One Soldier Changed My Life

Story shared from EF Educational Tours David is a Social Studies teacher from Summerside, PEI.  “I have been teaching at my school since 1995, but I didn’t catch the travel bug until about 10 years later.  I have always had a deep appreciation and respect for our veterans every November 11th. On a typical Remembrance Day, I would be sure to attend a ceremony at a local cenotaph and pay my respects in that fashion. My love affair with historical travel began almost in accident in 2006, when I participated in a summer institute and study program where I travelled...

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Before the Sliver Cross, there was the "Dead Man’s Penny"

1914-1918 Canadian soldiers Dead Man's Penny Hill 145 No Man’s Land Passcendaele The Battle of Vimy Ridge The Great War The Somme Treaty of Versailles trench warfare Verdun Vimy Memorial Vimy Ridge western front WWI Ypres

Before the Sliver Cross, there was the  "Dead Man’s Penny"

Information was sources from warmuseum.ca and wikipedia.org I was at a show recently and someone brought me a WW1 Memorial Plaque, known as the“Dead Man’s Penny”.  I was quite intrigued by it and thought I would source out the story and share it with you.   For the families and loved ones of fallen soldiers, grief and sorrow usually occurred without the finality or closure offered by having funeral rites or burials at home. Their memorial efforts might have included participation in national or local commemorative efforts, but they also involved oral traditions; maintaining and displaying cherished photos, letters, or...

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The Great War. 1914-1918

1914-1918 Allied Powers Barbed Wire Camouflage Canadian soldiers Chlorine gas Conscription front line Jusqu'au bout Mustard gas No Man’s Land Passcendaele Poppy shell shock tank The Great War The Somme Treaty of Versailles trench foot trench mouth trench warfare trenches Verdun Vimy Ridge western front WWI Ypres Zeppelin

The Great War. 1914-1918

Here is the back of a shirt I have coming to the site, it has a chronological list of events of Canada's participation in the great war, I researched the information from various sites and this is what I came up with. The Great War 1914-1918   Canada at War August 4, 1914: When Britain went to war on August 4, all colonies and dominions of the British Empire, like Canada and Newfoundland, were automatically at war. The Battle of Verdun February 21 - December 18, 1916: The Battle of Verdun is considered the greatest and lengthiest in world history....

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The Battle of Vimy Ridge (Information provided by Veteran's Affairs Canada)

Canadian Corps creeping barrage Hill 145 machine gun Sacrifice The Battle of Vimy Ridge The Great War the Pimple Treaty of Versailles Vimy Memorial Vimy Ridge western front WWI

The Battle of Vimy Ridge (Information provided by Veteran's Affairs Canada)

Introduction: The decades since the Battle of Vimy Ridge have slipped by, but the legacy of the Canadians who accomplished so much in that pivotal First World War battle lives on. Many say that Canada came of age as a country on those hard April days in 1917. The First World War: The First World War was the largest conflict the world had ever seen up until that time. It came about due to the political tensions and complex military alliances in Europe at the time. The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in the summer of 1914 resulted in an...

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