Cart 0

News — trench warfare

Some of the Most Effective Melee Weapons of WWI, The Bayonet Was Not One of Them

Battle Tactics First World War French Nails Kukri No Man’s Land trench club Trench Shovel trench warfare Vimy Memorial Vimy Ridge Weapons of WWI

Some of the Most Effective Melee Weapons of WWI, The Bayonet Was Not One of Them

By William Mclaughlin WWI was a terrifying fusion of old and new. An infantryman might have a slower-firing bolt action rifle, or he could find himself behind a rapid-firing Maxim gun. Mazes of trenches that ran for hundreds of miles were the setting of a lot of fighting. Trenches could be filled with gas, soaked and muddy, or partially collapsed by artillery. This made for frantic close-quarters-combat. In these confines and situations of overwhelming charges of men, melee weapons became extremely effective. A somewhat surprising fact is that the least preferred melee weapon was the bayonet, a knife attached to...

Read more →


Thomas Marion's Veteran Story By Malcolm Fraser

1914-1918 73rd Battalion 85th Battalion Cambrai. dogfight front line No Man’s Land Passcendaele shell shock the Black Watch The Great War trench warfare trenches Vimy Ridge western front WWI

Thomas Marion's Veteran Story By Malcolm Fraser

The photo is Letter from Thomas Marion to his mother. At the time of writing Thomas was in hospital in Brighton, England and commented on the many from his unit who have been killed, "many a mother's heart is breaking for her boy who will never return." My name is Malcolm Fraser. As far as my father is concerned, he enlisted when he was seventeen in the 73rd Battalion of the Black Watch, and he served at Lens, (Passchendaele, and Cambrai. He talked very, very little about the war. Once they were watching a dogfight over the trenches, and the...

Read more →


Before the Sliver Cross, there was the "Dead Man’s Penny"

1914-1918 Canadian soldiers Dead Man's Penny Hill 145 No Man’s Land Passcendaele The Battle of Vimy Ridge The Great War The Somme Treaty of Versailles trench warfare Verdun Vimy Memorial Vimy Ridge western front WWI Ypres

Before the Sliver Cross, there was the  "Dead Man’s Penny"

Information was sources from warmuseum.ca and wikipedia.org I was at a show recently and someone brought me a WW1 Memorial Plaque, known as the“Dead Man’s Penny”.  I was quite intrigued by it and thought I would source out the story and share it with you.   For the families and loved ones of fallen soldiers, grief and sorrow usually occurred without the finality or closure offered by having funeral rites or burials at home. Their memorial efforts might have included participation in national or local commemorative efforts, but they also involved oral traditions; maintaining and displaying cherished photos, letters, or...

Read more →


The Great War. 1914-1918

1914-1918 Allied Powers Barbed Wire Camouflage Canadian soldiers Chlorine gas Conscription front line Jusqu'au bout Mustard gas No Man’s Land Passcendaele Poppy shell shock tank The Great War The Somme Treaty of Versailles trench foot trench mouth trench warfare trenches Verdun Vimy Ridge western front WWI Ypres Zeppelin

The Great War. 1914-1918

Here is the back of a shirt I have coming to the site, it has a chronological list of events of Canada's participation in the great war, I researched the information from various sites and this is what I came up with. The Great War 1914-1918   Canada at War August 4, 1914: When Britain went to war on August 4, all colonies and dominions of the British Empire, like Canada and Newfoundland, were automatically at war. The Battle of Verdun February 21 - December 18, 1916: The Battle of Verdun is considered the greatest and lengthiest in world history....

Read more →


The Battle of Vimy Ridge - Fast Facts (Courtesy of Veteran's Affairs Canada)

1914-1918 British Expeditionary Force Canadian Corps Passcendaele The Great War Treaty of Versailles trench warfare Victoria Cross Vimy Ridge western front WWI

The Battle of Vimy Ridge - Fast Facts  (Courtesy of Veteran's Affairs Canada)

(Photo Courtesy of Brandi Murray it is an excerpt from her Great Grandfathers War Diary.) The assault on Vimy Ridge, the northern part of the wider battle of Arras, began at 5:30 am on Easter Monday, April 9, 1917. It was the first occasion on which all four divisions of the Canadian Corps attacked as a composite formation. The Canadian achievement in capturing Vimy Ridge owed its success to a range of technical and tactical innovations, very powerful artillery preparation, sound and meticulous planning and thorough preparation. At Vimy, the Canadian Corps and the British XVII Corps on their immediate...

Read more →