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Letter censorship on the front line

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Letter censorship on the front line

By Anthony Richards-30 May 2014 Keeping the Home Front posted, with millions of carefully censored letters zipping between soldiers and loved ones, was vital for maintaining morale. Each week, more than 12 million letters were delivered to soldiers during the First World War, providing opportunities to exchange news with family and friends, request parcels and confirm that they were still in one piece. As the main method of communicating with home, servicemen placed huge importance on correspondence which, from our modern perspective, can reveal the writer’s thoughts, beliefs and experiences while providing an immediacy often lacking in diaries or memoirs....

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A Soldiers' Life

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A Soldiers' Life

Information collected from Veteran’s Affairs Canada, The Canadian War Museum , WW1 Canada and Wikipedia Even before going into battle on the front lines, each soldier had to endure the reality of living with an army in the field.  Once assigned to the assault on Vimy Ridge, Canadian troops set up camps several kilometres behind the lines. There, though far from the front and out of the reach of enemy fire, they all learned to deal with death.  The spring of 1917 was one of inclement weather, and mud was a fact of life and soldiers frequently found themselves wading...

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Remembering Vimy Ridge

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Remembering Vimy Ridge

By Matthew S. Williams April 9, 2013   Though many people outside of Canada may not know much about it, the Battle of Vimy Ridge was one of the most significant battles of World War I and a key moment in Canada’s history. Taking place between April 9th and 14th of 1917, it was not only a Canadian-led offensive; it was also the only Allied offensive victory in the war to date. And just as importantly, we in Canada consider it a defining moment in our history, when our country ceased being a colony and became a nation. Surprising then...

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Veteran Stories: Francis Bathe a letter from The Battle of Vimy ridge

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Veteran Stories: Francis Bathe  a letter from The Battle of Vimy ridge

The picture is a Letter from Francis Bathe to his sister May (Bathe) Spencer from Doncaster Military Hospital on April 16, 1917. Mr. Bathe had just been at Vimy Ridge where he was injured. Courtesy of Jack Bathe, Francis' son. (Information courtesy of the Memory Project) April 16, 1917. Dear May, I guess you will be a little surprised to hear that I am back in Blighty, but of course you can never tell when those shells are going to shake paws with you, especially where we were last Monday on Vimy Ridge. It's just a week ago today when...

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Thomas Marion's Veteran Story By Malcolm Fraser

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Thomas Marion's Veteran Story By Malcolm Fraser

The photo is Letter from Thomas Marion to his mother. At the time of writing Thomas was in hospital in Brighton, England and commented on the many from his unit who have been killed, "many a mother's heart is breaking for her boy who will never return." My name is Malcolm Fraser. As far as my father is concerned, he enlisted when he was seventeen in the 73rd Battalion of the Black Watch, and he served at Lens, (Passchendaele, and Cambrai. He talked very, very little about the war. Once they were watching a dogfight over the trenches, and the...

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