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News — WWI

The Road To Vimy 100: How One Soldier Changed My Life

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The Road To Vimy 100: How One Soldier Changed My Life

Story shared from EF Educational Tours David is a Social Studies teacher from Summerside, PEI.  “I have been teaching at my school since 1995, but I didn’t catch the travel bug until about 10 years later.  I have always had a deep appreciation and respect for our veterans every November 11th. On a typical Remembrance Day, I would be sure to attend a ceremony at a local cenotaph and pay my respects in that fashion. My love affair with historical travel began almost in accident in 2006, when I participated in a summer institute and study program where I travelled...

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Battle of Vimy Ridge

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Battle of Vimy Ridge

Article by Richard Foot published 07/20/06 last edited 06/24/15 from Historica Canada The Battle of Vimy Ridge, during the First World War, is Canada's most celebrated military victory — a sometimes mythologized symbol of the birth of Canadian national pride and awareness. The four divisions of the Canadian Corps, fighting together for the first time, attacked the ridge from 9 to 12 April, 1917 and succeeded in capturing it from the German army. More than 10,500 Canadians were killed and wounded in the assault. Today an iconic white memorial atop the ridge commemorates the battle and honours the 11,285 Canadians...

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Vimy a Stunning Memorial and Live Minefield

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Vimy a Stunning Memorial and Live Minefield

This appeared in Maclean’s Magazine July 1, 2005 "NOTHING EXCEPT a battle lost can be half so melancholy as a battle won," wrote the Duke of Wellington about the dead and dying strewn across the field of Waterloo. A Canadian could have said as much on April 12, 1917, while standing on the grim heights of Vimy Ridge. Mercifully brief as the four-day assault was - a blink of the eye among the infamous months-long battles of the Great War - the victory still cost 3,600 Canadians their lives and wounded 7,000 more. The human damage has, to the extent...

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20 year old Philip Lemon was killed at Vimy Ridge on April 9, 1917.

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20 year old Philip Lemon was killed at Vimy Ridge on April 9, 1917.

Story by Ray Drouin, Philip Lemons Nephew from the Memory Project My name is Ray Drouin, my wife's name is Helen Johnson, and Phillip Lemon was our uncle. Phillip Lemon was born in Alton, England, in 1897. His father – Henry Lemon from Alton – served twenty-four years, and retired as Sergeant Instructor in musketry with the 3rd Sommersetshire Regiment of Light Infantry in India. Henry, upon completing his (..) of twenty-four years, retired to England in 1893. He emigrated to Canada in 1906, joining his father James in Walter's Falls, Ontario. Phillip was nine years old when he left...

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Veteran Stories: Francis Bathe a letter from The Battle of Vimy ridge

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Veteran Stories: Francis Bathe  a letter from The Battle of Vimy ridge

The picture is a Letter from Francis Bathe to his sister May (Bathe) Spencer from Doncaster Military Hospital on April 16, 1917. Mr. Bathe had just been at Vimy Ridge where he was injured. Courtesy of Jack Bathe, Francis' son. (Information courtesy of the Memory Project) April 16, 1917. Dear May, I guess you will be a little surprised to hear that I am back in Blighty, but of course you can never tell when those shells are going to shake paws with you, especially where we were last Monday on Vimy Ridge. It's just a week ago today when...

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